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Turkey: CARE - Women and Girls on the Move in the Midst of COVID-19 - June 2021

Status: Published 1 April 2021 - 31 May 2021
Not funded
Methodology: Data collection started, widgets.needs_assessment.status.5
Methodology description: CARE conducted 648 surveys with women in Gaziantep, Şanlıurfa and Kilis (49% Syrian refugees); 5 FGDs with Syrian refugee women (44 participants, aged 18 –24 years), 10 KIIs with external stakeholders and 8 KIIs with CARE Turkey staff.
Sampling: Random
Sampling size:
Target population: Other Refugee Urban / Rural Population

Turkey: CARE - Women and Girls on the Move in the Midst of COVID-19 - June 2021

Status: Published 1 April 2021 - 31 May 2021
Not funded
Methodology: Focus Group Discussion, Individual key informant interviews
Methodology description: CARE conducted 648 surveys with women in Gaziantep, Şanlıurfa and Kilis (49% Syrian refugees); 5 FGDs with Syrian refugee women (44 participants, aged 18 –24 years), 10 KIIs with external stakeholders and 8 KIIs with CARE Turkey staff.
Sampling: Random
Sampling size:
Target population: Other Refugee Urban / Rural Population
In order to understand the ways in which women and girls on the move are affected by the pandemic and how service providers can meaningfully adapt their programming to address the new and different vulnerabilities, needs, and risks that these women and girls face, CARE undertook a research in Afghanistan, Ecuador, and Turkey between April and May 2021. The objective of the study was to better understand how COVID-19 is impacting the health and protection of women and girls on the move. The three countries (Turkey, Afghanistan and Ecuador) represent different types of forced displacement across multiple regions: IDPs and refugee returnees in Afghanistan; more recent migrants and refugees due to the Venezuelan crisis in Ecuador; and longer-term Syrian refugees living under temporary international protection in Turkey. CARE chose health and protection as the specific themes, given past learning on how their outcomes and service access and utilization are particularly impacted during public health emergencies and because of the pre-existing vulnerabilities that women and girls on the move experience in relation to being protected and staying healthy. Accordingly, CARE conducted 648 surveys with women in Gaziantep, Şanlıurfa and Kilis (49% Syrian refugees); 5 FGDs with Syrian refugee women (44 participants, aged 18 –24 years), 10 KIIs with external stakeholders and 8 KIIs with CARE Turkey staff.

Main Findings
ACCESS & UTILIZATION OF SERVICES:  24% of Syrian women reported they go “less” or can no longer access during COVID-19 health services (for health checkups and general services) compared to 42% amongst host community women. There were some difference in the reasons provided with more Syrian women reporting due to closure of closest hospital/ center during COVID-19 while host community women more likely reported that they were turned away or there was no space at the hospital/clinic. Many Syrian refugee women reported facing additional problems accessing health care during the pandemic due to the new telephone appointment system required for Turkish citizens and registered refugees to access public hospitals and health services, language barrier and lack of TPID.  27% of Syrian women reported “less” or can no longer access maternity care services during COVID-19 compared to 12% amongst host community. However, host community women reported more previous access challenges than Syrian women (27% compared to 20%). COVID-19 PREVENTION & RESPONSE:  Only 1% of displaced women compared to 0% amongst host community women reported that they are not aware of any COVID-19 prevention measures or did not know.  27% of displaced women compared to 65% of host community women reported that they know someone in their community who has tested positive for COVID-19. Of these, 93% of all women (with no difference in displacement status) believed that the person had accessed medical treatment. 77% of displaced women compared to 74% of host community women reported that they could access COVID-19 testing if required.  35% of displaced women compared to 57% of host community women reported that they would get vaccinated. 64% of displaced women and 26% of host community women reported “no” or “I don’t know”. For those that said ”no”, 43% of displaced women and 39% of host community women reported it was due to fear of negative side effects and 25% and 36% respectively reported due to lack of evidence of effectiveness EXCLUSION:  Syrian women reported that they feel more excluded from assessing services and resources during the pandemic (36% compared to 29% for host community). This figure rises to 44% for displaced women when combining excluded and “I already felt excluded” compared to 33% for host community RISKS AND PREVALENCE OF GBV:  24% of displaced women compared to 54% of host community women believed that the risk of violence and abuse of women had increased during COVID-19. Both displaced and host community women overwhelming reported that the risks of violence and abuse for women have increased because of more conflict in the home (91% for displaced compared to 79% for displaced) . Less freedom of women and women are under more pressure at home as primary caregivers and carers was also frequently reported by both displaced and host community women.  More host community women compared to displaced women also reported that there are fewer safe spaces to go (27% compared to 4%). 17% of displaced women compared to 28% of host community women believed that the risk of violence and abuse of girls had increased during COVID-19  Girls dropping out of school and spending more time on the streets and being forced to work were also commonly reported. More host community than Syrian women reported that girls were being forced to marry (63% compared to 15%) ACCESS TO REGISTRATION AND CIVIL DOCUMENTATION:  19% of displaced women reported new or different challenges during COVID-19. In terms of types of issues faced, the top three reported were: time to access services increased due to COVID-19 restrictions (31%); language problems (28%); and unable to travel due to movement restrictions (25%) MENTAL HEALTH  67% of displaced compared to 83% of host community women agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that they feel lonelier, more stressed, anxious or irritable since the onset of the pandemic. 28% of displaced women and 19% of host community women either disagreed or strongly disagreed with a statement asking if they felt they had someone to turn to with their day to day problems WOMEN’S PARTICIPATION AND DECISION-MAKING:  Similar patterns between displaced and host community in general were reported in that COVID-19 has not led to increased personal decision-making with only around working and accessing health care reported to have significantly increased. With no major differences between displaced and host community women, in general women reported that COVID-19 has increased their responsibilities in the home in terms of cleaning, cooking and care. The only significant decrease was in relation to shopping, perhaps due to the COVID-19 movement restrictions.

Partners


Sectors

  •  Protection

Locations

  • Turkey

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