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WASH Infrastructure & Services Assessment in Zaatari Camp

Status: Published 12 February 2017 - 5 March 2017
Funded
Sampling: Random
Sampling size: 68,221 individules
Target population: Population in Camp
Target settlement: Individual accommodation (not hosted)
Unit of Measurement: Household, Individual

WASH Infrastructure & Services Assessment in Zaatari Camp

Status: Published 12 February 2017 - 5 March 2017
Funded
Sampling: Random
Sampling size: 68,221 individules
Target population: Population in Camp
Target settlement: Individual accommodation (not hosted)
Unit of Measurement: Household, Individual
The primary objective of this assessment was to evaluate the impact of this wastewater management project as well as general WASH practices in the camp in order to inform future programming. More specifically, the assessment focused on the use of the following WASH infrastructure and WASH-related services by camp residents: Private WASH infrastructure Communal sewage interceptor tank damage Water supply Waste water and solid waste disposal Repair & maintenance

Main Findings
The large majority of households (98.4%) reported having private toilets in Zaatari camp. 99.5% of toilets were connected to the wastewater network via a phase 1 concrete tank. Further, 89.2% of the respondent population perceived that the connection to PRC “improved” or “greatly improved” the sanitation situation. 47.4% of toilets were determined to be unsuitable according to UNICEF standards; only in a third (30.9%) of cases had the households contacted an NGO to upgrade their facilities. 34.3% (946) of the tanks assessed as part of this survey were found to be damaged. The proportion of damaged tanks varied significantly between districts. The most frequently reported damage was the removal of metal caps from the ventilation pipes. The most frequently reported reason why communal WASH infrastructure is being altered or damaged was due to kids playing with the pipes’ ventilation covers. The majority of the households (67.8%) reported using the free water trucking from NGO as their primary source of drinking water. Of the 32.1% reported purchasing drinking water from a private vendor, 95% felt the quality of the trucked water was not good enough to drink. Almost all households (99.4%) reported generating grey water inside of their home on daily basis. The most frequent method of disposal was a phase 1 concrete tank, although a minority of households (9.1%) are still pouring grey water on the street. 99.6% of households reported producing solid waste inside their homes, the majority of whom (97.2%) use garbage bins for disposal, and almost half (45.4%) use the garbage collection service provided by NGOs. At the camp-level, 79.2% of the households reported having a washing machine Overall, the majority of respondents were able to correctly name the primary WASH services provider in their district. However, 21.8% did not know. 8.7% of households wanted to report a WASH related issue in the last 3 months, although this varied considerably across the districts. Of these households, over three quarters (79.4%) did report. The majority of issues were reported via the WASH services hotline, and were about desludging operations. Of those who reported a WASH-related issue in the last three months, 42.7% perceived the answer they got from the NGO as “inadequate” or “ very inadequate”. The most frequently reported reason for dissatisfaction was the lack of response to the issue they reported (62.4%).

Sectors

  •  Water Sanitation Hygiene

Locations

  • Jordan
  • Mafraq Governorate
  • Zaatari Refugee Camp
  • Syrian Arab Republic